Low Back Pain & Non Force Adjustments/SOT Blocking: A NYC Chiropractor/Applied Kinesiologist/NeuroKinetic Therapist Explains

One of the major complaints that causes patients to seek out a doctor of chiropractic is low back pain; it can be caused by either a problem with the lumbar spine or the sacrum.

As a doctor of chiropractic who is also an applied kinesiologist, I use a technique developed by Dr. DeJarnette called Sacro Occipital Technique (SOT); so named because of the relationship between the sacrum (base of the spine) and the occiput (base of the skull).

One of the functions of the sacrum is to pump cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) from the base of the spine back up the spinal canal to the brain and throughout the nervous system. The occiput also helps to pump CSF. The minute rhythmical motion is essential to optimal health – CSF effectively acts as the circulatory system of the brain and spinal cord.

The pelvis forms the foundational support of the human skeleton. It supports the upper body right up to the skull, and enables us to transfer our weight to our legs. The sacrum is a large bone located at the terminal part of the vertebral spine, where it forms the posterior aspect of the pelvis. The spine holds our body upright, supports all of our organs and provides anchor points for our muscles. It also protects our delicate nervous system. The nervous system controls our body, and can only function normally when our structures are balanced and our pelvis, sacrum and lumbar is stable.

Dr. DeJarnette’s studied two aspects of the sacroiliac joint; the anterior synovial portion and the posterior hyaline cartilage portion. The anterior sacroiliac joint should have motion and this is where sacral nutation and counternutation takes place. The posterior sacroiliac joint is focused on weight-bearing stability and support, which is why at the posterior joint surface there are interlocking of the ridges, and grooves by structures like muscles, ligaments and fascia.

DeJarnette evaluated the weight-bearing characteristics of the sacroiliac joint and determined that when the joint could not adequately support body weight then load bearing stress will be moved upward to the L5/S1 and L4/5 discs, most commonly.

DeJarnette developed an analysis which classified pelvic problems into three different categories and three different non-force techniques using SOT blocks in positions that correct the involved category.

sot-blocks

One of the major complaints that causes patients to seek out a doctor of chiropractic is low back pain; it can be caused by either a problem with the lumbar spine or the sacrum.

As a doctor of chiropractic who is also an applied kinesiologist, I use a technique developed by Dr. DeJarnette called Sacro Occipital Technique (SOT); so named because of the relationship between the sacrum (base of the spine) and the occiput (base of the skull).

One of the functions of the sacrum is to pump Cerebro-Spinal Fluid (CSF) from the base of the spine back up the spinal canal to the brain and throughout the nervous system. The occiput also helps to pump CSF. The minute rhythmical motion is essential to optimal health – CSF effectively acts as the circulatory system of the brain and spinal cord.

The pelvis forms the foundational support of the human skeleton. It supports the upper body right up to the skull, and enables us to transfer our weight to our legs. The sacrum is a large bone located at the terminal part of the vertebral spine, where it forms the posterior aspect of the pelvis. The spine holds our body upright, supports all of our organs and provides anchor points for our muscles. It also protects our delicate nervous system. The nervous system controls our body, and can only function normally when our structures are balanced and our pelvis, sacrum and lumbar is stable.

Dr. DeJarnette’s studied two aspects of the sacroiliac joint; the anterior synovial portion and the posterior hyaline cartilage portion. The anterior sacroiliac joint should have motion and this is where sacral nutation and counternutation takes place. 

pelvic-ligaments-ant

si-movement

The posterior sacroiliac joint is focused on weight-bearing stability and support, which is why at the posterior joint surface there are interlocking of the ridges, and grooves by structures like muscles, ligaments and fascia.

postsacrummuscles

DeJarnette evaluated the weight-bearing characteristics of the sacroiliac joint and determined that when the joint could not adequately support body weight then load bearing stress will be moved upward to the L5/S1 and L4/5 discs, most commonly.

DeJarnette developed an analysis which classified pelvic problems into three different categories and three different non-force techniques using SOT blocks in positions that correct the involved category.

Category One is a pelvic torsion with altered sacral nutation(motion)  This lack of nutation affects the spinal and cranial meningeal and CSF systems which function to a degree like a closed kinematic chain. Therefore symptoms can be low back pain, chronic shoulder complaints, thoracic outlet syndrome, CSF stagnation, and altered vasomotor function.

Involved muscles can be the piriformis, quadratus lumborum, sacrospinalis, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. As an applied kinesiologist, I’d check to see if they are hypotonic or hypertonic; as a neurokinetic therapist, I’d check to see if a muscle is weak (or inhibited) by another muscle compensating.

Therapy localization (TL) is done by putting 2 hands on each sacral-iliac joint and then challenging the pelvis for a structural listing and then blocks are put under the patient’s pelvis based to the findings.

The positive Tl’ed side is not adjusted. Cranials are checked.

Category Two happens when ligaments that hold the sacroiliac joint are stretched or sprained, allowing the joint surfaces to separate. Stress can aggravate this ligament weakness via adrenal hormone overdrive.

Symptoms can be low back pain, bowel complaints, possible dysfunction of the reproductive glands and the adrenals, shoulder problems and decreased cervical range of motion.

Involved muscles in addition to the ones mentioned in Category I are the sartorius, gracilis, rectus abdominals and hamstrings along with the iliolumbar ligament. These structures are tested via applied kinesiology and neurokinetic protocols mentioned above. Cranials again are checked.

Category Three occurs when the low back can no longer tolerate the physical stressors placed on it and involves both disc and nerve root aggravation. This can be a sudden one-off event such as a lift, or it can be a pre-existing weakness that is aggravated. Often Category Three produces pain in the low back and sometimes pain radiates down a leg as sciatica.

Muscles to be checked are the psoas as it attaches into the front of the lumbar vertebrae as well as the muscles involved in Category One as Category Three can be a Category One that was never corrected.

Correction in all the categories involves using blocks under the pelvis in specific directions related to the category and the subluxation/misalignment of the pelvis/sacrum. The patient’s weight and breathing help to balance the low back, sacrum and CSF flow and takes the pressure or irritation off the nerve. This allows the body to heal.

Patient is told to ice the involved areas, how to do daily activities, given stretches and exercises and advised on nutrition to help the body heal.

For more information on issues mentioned:

Cranial Sacral Therapy in Applied Kinesiology

How a Combination of Applied Kinesiology, NeuroKinetic Therapy and Chiropractic Works

The Use of Applied Kinesiology in a Chiropractic Examination

© 2017-Dr. Vittoria Repetto

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

 Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings? 

https://www.facebook.com/wvillagechiropracticappliedkinesiologynkt/

Or join me at Twitter: www.twitter.com/DrVRepetto

My Facebook Page

Please follow me on my facebook page by clicking on the LIKE button

On Facebook, my page is London Terrace Chiropractic &Applied Kinesiology http://www.facebook.com/pages/London-Terrace-Chiropractic-Applied-Kinesiology/109622855768202

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com.
And please check out the Patient Testimonials at the “Our Practice” page at the web site

Please follow me on Twitter.; my user name is DrVRepetto

Is Low Fat Really Healthy?

Or is a little bit of whole fat better for you?

So here we are with all the health gurus telling us that we should be eating all our foods in their natural forms aka un-processed. And yet when most of them talk about dairy, the majority of these people talk about drinking and consuming low fat milk, yogurt and cheeses. And of course, the same people talk about not using things like coconut milk or eating egg yolks. In fact I have seen articles talking about the Mediterranean diet and talking about how low fat dairy is part of that diet.

This is strange to this daughter of Italian immigrants who on her travels from her teenage yrs to the present (59 yrs old) never saw her grandparents who lived into their uppers 90’s & low 100’s (nonno & nonna – the latter) or the present healthy 80 something’s in her father’ hometown eat anything low fat. We have been so obsessed with the concept of low fat/saturated fat/no fat that for over 30 years we have poisoned ourselves by eating margarine and substituting trans fats for saturated fats and have added refined sugars (or worse high fructose corn syrup) to products like yogurt and ice cream. And yet we are fatter and much more important less healthy than we were thirty years ago.

One of our current epidemics is the low levels of Vitamin D in the general population.  Could the fact that we are not consuming enough fat to help absorb the fat soluble vitamins like Vitamin D(the fat soluble vitamins are Vitamin A, D, E and K) and Omega 3’s be playing a part in this besides not getting enough sun?  Fat also help us absorb proteins and calcium. Our brains also need fat; in fact our brains are mainly fat: http://www.fi.edu/learn/brain/fats.html#fatsbuild.

Could this obsession with low fat and 30 yrs of substituting trans fats be a factor in the rise of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s?? How might a low fat diet affect our dopamine receptors and our fat receptors in our tonque and brain?  Click here: Discovery of ‘fat’ taste could hold the key to reducing obesity

Are you taking turmeric as a natural inflammatory supplement; talk to an Ayurvedic healer and they will tell you that cooking turmeric in butter (ghee) or coconut oil or milk (in addition in combo with black pepper) potentates the effect of the turmeric.

We also know that whole fat dairy products (esp. from grass fed ruminants) contain more conjugated linoleic acid and has been shown to be possibly effective for preventing colon & rectal cancer, weight loss and atherosclerosis. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-826-CONJUGATED%20LINOLEIC%20ACID.aspx?activeIngredientId=826&activeIngredientName=CONJUGATED%20LINOLEIC%20ACID#vit_interactions http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/582029 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjugated_linoleic_acid

Inflammation and Brain Health

Research has shown links between our modern high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet, and increasing rates of certain diseases, particularly those relating to neurological dysfunction and overall brain health. As neurodegenerative disorders rise, so too has sugar consumption in the Western world. Yet, new research has shown that healthy, fat-rich diets have a myriad of benefits to the brain on the macro-scale in brain function, and benefits on the micro-scale in terms of inflammation. Recent studies have documented blood sugar’s effect on a wide collection of troubles from the size of the hippocampus, to diabetes, stroke and dementia risk.

And to be fair, some of the health gurus either do not demonize saturated fat or are starting to understand that it’s not fat but inflammation and the role that refined carbohydrates have in increasing the inflammation that has a bad effect on your heath. Please read: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mercola/the-cholesterol-myth-that_b_676817.html & http://www.huffingtonpost.com/andrew-weil-md/healthy-eating_b_629422.html

So what am I saying?

If you can tolerate dairy products and enjoy them, try switching to quality whole milk products (organic, growth hormone & antibiotic free, non-homogenized, grass fed, etc.) and eat them in moderation; maybe a few spoonfuls of yogurt a day or one pound of cheese consumed over 1-2 weeks.

If you eat meat, again eat them in moderation…try lean cuts from animals that have been grass-fed & raised in a sustainable manner. Eat no more than 4 ozs. a day and try to limit it to 4 times a week. Enjoy your eggs as nature intended w/ the yolks but limit yourself to 8-10 a week. And either cook them w/ olive oil instead of butter or poach them.

fats-that-can-reduce-your-risk-of-dying-exlarge-169

Eat lots of sources of mono-unsaturated fats in addition, incorporate some nuts and seeds into your diet, eat lots of veggies, some fresh fruit and stay away from refined sugars and fake or trans fats.

In other words,  enjoy your food in all its unprocessed whole glory, just be moderate in your intake.

Here are some studies comparing low fat milk to whole fat milk:  In a study in American Journal of Epidemiology 2007;166(11):1259-1269 entitled Calcium, Vitamin D, and Dairy Product Intake and Prostate Cancer Risk: The Multiethnic Cohort Study, no association of calcium or vitamin D intake was seen across racial/ethnic groups. In analyses of food groups, dairy product and total milk consumption were not associated with prostate cancer risk. However, low-/nonfat milk was related to an increased risk and whole milk to a decreased risk of total prostate cancer http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/567465

Eight-year-old children who drink full-fat milk every day have a lower BMI than those who seldom drink milk. This is not the case for children who often drink medium-fat or low-fat milk. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091103102347.htm University of Gothenburg (2009, November 4). Children Who Often Drink Full-Fat Milk Weigh Less, Swedish Research Finds. ScienceDaily.

In a study of Effect of consumption of whole milk and skim milk on blood lipid profiles in healthy men, the drinkers of whole milk had low lipid profiles http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8116537

In a 16 yr. study of Dairy consumption and patterns of mortality of Australian adults: there was no consistent and significant association between total dairy intake and total or cause-specific mortality. However, compared with those with the lowest intake of full-fat dairy, participants with the highest intake (median intake 339 g/day) had reduced death due to CVD (HR: 0.31; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12–0.79; P for trend=0.04) after adjustment for calcium intake and other confounders. Intakes of low-fat dairy, specific dairy foods, calcium and vitamin D showed no consistent associations.  http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v64/n6/abs/ejcn201045a.html

A reduction in dietary saturated fat has generally been thought to improve cardiovascular health.  The objective of this meta-analysis was to summarizethe evidence related to the association of dietary saturatedfat with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and cardiovasculardisease (CVD; CHD inclusive of stroke) in prospective epidemiologicstudies. Design: Twenty-one studies identified by searching MEDLINE andEMBASE databases and secondary referencing qualified for inclusionin this study. A random-effects model was used to derive compositerelative risk estimates for CHD, stroke, and CVD. Results: During 5–23 y of follow-up of 347,747 subjects,11,006 developed CHD or stroke. Intake of saturated fat wasnot associated with an increased risk of CHD, stroke, or CVD.The pooled relative risk estimates that compared extreme quantilesof saturated fat intake were 1.07 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.19; P = 0.22)for CHD, 0.81 (95% CI: 0.62, 1.05; P = 0.11) for stroke, and1.00 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.11; P = 0.95) for CVD. Consideration ofage, sex, and study quality did not change the results. Conclusions: A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studiesshowed that there is no significant evidence for concludingthat dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased riskof CHD or CVD. More data are needed to elucidate whether CVDrisks are likely to be influenced by the specific nutrientsused to replace saturated fat. http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/ajcn.2009.27725v1

Dairy Consumption and the Incidence of Hyperglycemia and the Metabolic Syndrome: Results from a French prospective study, Data from the Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR). This study links dairy intake with lower BMI , BP, TG, & reduced insulin resistance. (not funded by industry) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21447660  

Component in Common Whole Fat Dairy Foods May Cut Diabetes Risk http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101220200000.htm

© 2010-Dr. Vittoria Repetto  

© 2016 revision – Dr Vittoria Repetto

 

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com
And please check out the Patient Testimonials at my web site

Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings?Click here: London Terrace Chiropractic & Applied Kinesiology

 Or join me at Twitter: www.twitter.com/DrVRepetto