A NYC Chiropractor & Applied Kinesiologist & NeuroKinetic Therapist Moves Her Practice to 230 W. 13th Street

As of Saturday Feb 4th, Dr. Vittoria Repetto will be seeing patients at 230 W 13th Street #1B ( between 7th Ave & Horatio St).  NY 10011 in the West Village

Our phone number will still be 212-431-3724.

Office hours will be Tuesday & Saturday 2pm – 8pm

Ring bell D

Take door on the right. Walk down one floor.230w13th-street

For those who know the West Village, this is the same block as Integral Yoga and the LGBT Center.

The 1,2,3, A, C, E, F, L & M  subway lines are near by as are the M14A, M14D, M20 & M7 bus lines.

Dr Repetto will no longer be working at 455 W 23th Street.

The name of the Facebook page London Terrace Chiropractic & Applied Kinesiology will be changed to West Village Chiropractic & Applied Kinesiology on Feb 1st

The new site does have a flexion-distraction table which allows  Dr Repetto to open up and relax her patient’s spine more esp great for those  w/ disc or spinal stenosis problems .

Twitter page @DrVRepetto

A NYC Chiropractor/Applied Kinesiologist Starts Adding Neuro Kinetic Therapy to the Mix

As some of you know I took the Level 1 seminar of Neuro Kinetic Therapy earlier this September. https://drvittoriarepetto.wordpress.com/2015/09/01/taking-neuro-kinetic-therapy-seminar-sept-12nd-13th/

While Applied Kinesiology looks mainly at balancing individual muscles, NKT works with the theory that that movement is performed in systems or patterns instead of individual muscles.

The human brain also has an affinity toward habits. Repetitive behaviors become patterns and these patterns require reprogramming when they become problematic (Faulty Movement Patterns).

NKT identifies muscle imbalances by using muscle testing to determine what muscles are inhibited and what muscles are compensating for them.

After an inhibited/weak muscle is found, I would muscle test a synergistic (a helper muscle) or an antagonist muscle (an opposing muscle) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatomical_terms_of_muscle which is strong/facilitated that may be affecting the inhibited muscle. That facilitated muscle would be therapy localized (the muscle is either touched or put in motion) and the inhibited muscle retested. If the TL strengthens the inhibited muscle, then I know that the TLed muscle is affecting the inhibited muscle.

One can then use whatever techniques the practitioner knows in order to release the compensating muscle; in my case, I use the following AK techniques. https://drvittoriarepetto.wordpress.com/2010/06/21/muscle-balancing-in-applied-kinesiology/

https://drvittoriarepetto.wordpress.com/2011/02/16/how-an-applied-kinesiologist-uses-neuro-lymphatics-to-improve-health/

https://drvittoriarepetto.wordpress.com/2011/07/29/how-a-nyc-applied-kinesiologist-uses-neurovascular-pts-for-better-physical-and-emotional-wellbeing/

The inhibited muscle is then retested which should test strong now, the retesting causes a “neural lock” which reprograms the motor control center in the brain.

Corrective exercises to restore proper movement patterns and reprogram the motor control center can be given.

Here is an example in which I used a mix of AK & NKT:

A male patient came in with rt. low back/lumbar flank pain after sneezing in the shower; patient said that he was “unprepared for the sneeze.” He touches the area of his quadratus lumborum. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadratus_lumborum_muscle

I first test the psoas; an important muscle for the low back which I always test in low back problems and a muscle which connects with the diaphragm muscle.    http://corewalking.com/walking-and-breathing/ 

I find the rt. QL and lt. psoas weak; I ask the patient to touch the sternum which is the neuro-lymphatic point for the diaphragm; the main breathing muscle involved in a sudden sneeze. I then retested the weak QL and psoas while patient is touching  (therapy localizing); they now test strong.

I then rub the neuro lymphatic pt. for the diaphragm and find a place on his rib that is tender and flailing out due to over contraction of the diaphragm and massage to get a release.

I then retest the QL and the psoas, they both test strong; the retesting created a “neural lock.” I then adjust the patient’s spine and pelvis. Corrective exercises are given.

© 2015-Dr. Vittoria Repetto

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

 Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings? 

https://www.facebook.com/wvillagechiropracticappliedkinesiologynkt/

Or join me at Twitter: www.twitter.com/DrVRepetto

The Musculoskeletal Aspects of Asthma

Like most of you, I’ve been watching the Olympics and as I watched, I remembered a previous Summer Olympics and watching the start of the Women’s Marathon. I noticed something in the body language of one of the front runners and said to my friends, “That runner has asthma; look at her neck.”  My friends chuckled and then the announcer talking about the runner I pointed out said that she suffered from asthma.

“How did you know?’ asked my surprised friends. Her SCM (sternocleidomastoid) muscle http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sternocleidomastoid_muscle was very pronounced. Instead of using her primary muscles of inspiration, her diaphragm, the external intercostals and the sternocostalis; she was using an accessory one.  http://skeletalmuscularsystem.suite101.com/article.cfm/muscles_of_inspiration It was causing her rib cage to be higher in position on her torso and more barrel shaped: a classic visual for asthma patients

In  my Applied Kinesiology practice, I see a number of patients with breathing problems. To a person they all have problems using their diaphragm muscle properly, they use small muscles higher up in the chest and shoulders creating  a “barrel-shaped” chest. And many have problems w/ their intercostal muscles and the up of down movement of the ribs; their rib joints don’t move properly therefore not allowing the movement of the chest.

Tightness and/or weakness is also found in the Pectoralis major & minor, SCM, the Anterior & Middle Scalenes and the Serratus anterior as well as other accessory muscles, they tested to find out if they are inhibited or compensating.

breathing muscles

With applied kinesiology, I can use golgi tendon and muscle spindle reflexes to re-set the muscles and use neuro-lymphatic & neuro-vascular points to flush toxics out of the muscles. I restest the inhibited/weak muscles to get a neural lock in the brain’s muscle center.

I use neuro-lymphatic & neuro- vascular pts to help lymph and blood flow to the diaphragm and also give the patient breathing exercises to strengthen the diaphragm.

I also stimulate acu-points for the lung meridian and it’s brother/sister pair- the large intestine meridian which may indicate that the patient needs probiotics.

The cervical & thoracic spine are checked for subluxations/somatic dysfunction as the nerves from these areas  innervate the before mentioned muscles and the lung and are adjusted as needed.  The articulations of the rib joints to both the vertebrae and the sternum are also important to check.

Working on all these aspects causes the bio-mechanics of the chest to work better and breathing is freed up.

Of course causes of both bronchial and lung and general inflammation need to be found and worked on via nutrition and lifestyle changes; but that is another blog.

And by the way, though they usually do not need it, I always warn my patients to no matter how well their breathing feels, to always carry an inhaler, just in case.

 

©  2010-Dr. Vittoria Repetto

©  Revised 2015 -Dr. Vittoria Repetto

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice at 230 W. 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials at my web site.

 Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings? Follow me at https://www.facebook.com/wvillagechiropracticappliedkinesiologynkt/

Or join me at Twitter: www.twitter.com/DrVRepetto