Medical Articles Of Interest for February 2017

Eggs, High Dietary Cholesterol Not Linked to Increased Risk for Dementia, Alzheimer’s

Dr Repetto’s comment: Egg yolks contain choline, a supplement important for brain health.

Matching the Right Diet to the Right Patient

Sitting Less Linked to Lower Risk of Diabetes

DHA Supplements Linked to Less Progression to Alzheimer’s in APOE4 Carriers

More Support for Gut-Brain Link in Autism

Mediterranean Diet With Olive Oil Boosted HDL Function: PREDIMED

Dietary Protein – From Any Source – May Help Muscle Health

Vitamin D May Protect Against Respiratory Infections

Studies Suggest Cardiovascular Sweet Spot at Two Drinks per Day

Sports Hernias, Adductor Injuries, and Hip Problems Are Linked

 

Low Back Pain & Non Force Adjustments/SOT Blocking: A NYC Chiropractor/Applied Kinesiologist/NeuroKinetic Therapist Explains

One of the major complaints that causes patients to seek out a doctor of chiropractic is low back pain; it can be caused by either a problem with the lumbar spine or the sacrum.

As a doctor of chiropractic who is also an applied kinesiologist, I use a technique developed by Dr. DeJarnette called Sacro Occipital Technique (SOT); so named because of the relationship between the sacrum (base of the spine) and the occiput (base of the skull).

One of the functions of the sacrum is to pump cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) from the base of the spine back up the spinal canal to the brain and throughout the nervous system. The occiput also helps to pump CSF. The minute rhythmical motion is essential to optimal health – CSF effectively acts as the circulatory system of the brain and spinal cord.

The pelvis forms the foundational support of the human skeleton. It supports the upper body right up to the skull, and enables us to transfer our weight to our legs. The sacrum is a large bone located at the terminal part of the vertebral spine, where it forms the posterior aspect of the pelvis. The spine holds our body upright, supports all of our organs and provides anchor points for our muscles. It also protects our delicate nervous system. The nervous system controls our body, and can only function normally when our structures are balanced and our pelvis, sacrum and lumbar is stable.

Dr. DeJarnette’s studied two aspects of the sacroiliac joint; the anterior synovial portion and the posterior hyaline cartilage portion. The anterior sacroiliac joint should have motion and this is where sacral nutation and counternutation takes place. The posterior sacroiliac joint is focused on weight-bearing stability and support, which is why at the posterior joint surface there are interlocking of the ridges, and grooves by structures like muscles, ligaments and fascia.

DeJarnette evaluated the weight-bearing characteristics of the sacroiliac joint and determined that when the joint could not adequately support body weight then load bearing stress will be moved upward to the L5/S1 and L4/5 discs, most commonly.

DeJarnette developed an analysis which classified pelvic problems into three different categories and three different non-force techniques using SOT blocks in positions that correct the involved category.

sot-blocks

One of the major complaints that causes patients to seek out a doctor of chiropractic is low back pain; it can be caused by either a problem with the lumbar spine or the sacrum.

As a doctor of chiropractic who is also an applied kinesiologist, I use a technique developed by Dr. DeJarnette called Sacro Occipital Technique (SOT); so named because of the relationship between the sacrum (base of the spine) and the occiput (base of the skull).

One of the functions of the sacrum is to pump Cerebro-Spinal Fluid (CSF) from the base of the spine back up the spinal canal to the brain and throughout the nervous system. The occiput also helps to pump CSF. The minute rhythmical motion is essential to optimal health – CSF effectively acts as the circulatory system of the brain and spinal cord.

The pelvis forms the foundational support of the human skeleton. It supports the upper body right up to the skull, and enables us to transfer our weight to our legs. The sacrum is a large bone located at the terminal part of the vertebral spine, where it forms the posterior aspect of the pelvis. The spine holds our body upright, supports all of our organs and provides anchor points for our muscles. It also protects our delicate nervous system. The nervous system controls our body, and can only function normally when our structures are balanced and our pelvis, sacrum and lumbar is stable.

Dr. DeJarnette’s studied two aspects of the sacroiliac joint; the anterior synovial portion and the posterior hyaline cartilage portion. The anterior sacroiliac joint should have motion and this is where sacral nutation and counternutation takes place. 

pelvic-ligaments-ant

si-movement

The posterior sacroiliac joint is focused on weight-bearing stability and support, which is why at the posterior joint surface there are interlocking of the ridges, and grooves by structures like muscles, ligaments and fascia.

postsacrummuscles

DeJarnette evaluated the weight-bearing characteristics of the sacroiliac joint and determined that when the joint could not adequately support body weight then load bearing stress will be moved upward to the L5/S1 and L4/5 discs, most commonly.

DeJarnette developed an analysis which classified pelvic problems into three different categories and three different non-force techniques using SOT blocks in positions that correct the involved category.

Category One is a pelvic torsion with altered sacral nutation(motion)  This lack of nutation affects the spinal and cranial meningeal and CSF systems which function to a degree like a closed kinematic chain. Therefore symptoms can be low back pain, chronic shoulder complaints, thoracic outlet syndrome, CSF stagnation, and altered vasomotor function.

Involved muscles can be the piriformis, quadratus lumborum, sacrospinalis, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. As an applied kinesiologist, I’d check to see if they are hypotonic or hypertonic; as a neurokinetic therapist, I’d check to see if a muscle is weak (or inhibited) by another muscle compensating.

Therapy localization (TL) is done by putting 2 hands on each sacral-iliac joint and then challenging the pelvis for a structural listing and then blocks are put under the patient’s pelvis based to the findings.

The positive Tl’ed side is not adjusted. Cranials are checked.

Category Two happens when ligaments that hold the sacroiliac joint are stretched or sprained, allowing the joint surfaces to separate. Stress can aggravate this ligament weakness via adrenal hormone overdrive.

Symptoms can be low back pain, bowel complaints, possible dysfunction of the reproductive glands and the adrenals, shoulder problems and decreased cervical range of motion.

Involved muscles in addition to the ones mentioned in Category I are the sartorius, gracilis, rectus abdominals and hamstrings along with the iliolumbar ligament. These structures are tested via applied kinesiology and neurokinetic protocols mentioned above. Cranials again are checked.

Category Three occurs when the low back can no longer tolerate the physical stressors placed on it and involves both disc and nerve root aggravation. This can be a sudden one-off event such as a lift, or it can be a pre-existing weakness that is aggravated. Often Category Three produces pain in the low back and sometimes pain radiates down a leg as sciatica.

Muscles to be checked are the psoas as it attaches into the front of the lumbar vertebrae as well as the muscles involved in Category One as Category Three can be a Category One that was never corrected.

Correction in all the categories involves using blocks under the pelvis in specific directions related to the category and the subluxation/misalignment of the pelvis/sacrum. The patient’s weight and breathing help to balance the low back, sacrum and CSF flow and takes the pressure or irritation off the nerve. This allows the body to heal.

Patient is told to ice the involved areas, how to do daily activities, given stretches and exercises and advised on nutrition to help the body heal.

For more information on issues mentioned:

Cranial Sacral Therapy in Applied Kinesiology

How a Combination of Applied Kinesiology, NeuroKinetic Therapy and Chiropractic Works

The Use of Applied Kinesiology in a Chiropractic Examination

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

 Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings? 

https://www.facebook.com/wvillagechiropracticappliedkinesiologynkt/

Or join me at Twitter: www.twitter.com/DrVRepetto

A NYC Chiropractor & Applied Kinesiologist & NeuroKinetic Therapist Moves Her Practice to 230 W. 13th Street

As of Saturday Feb 4th, Dr. Vittoria Repetto will be seeing patients at 230 W 13th Street #1B ( between 7th Ave & Horatio St).  NY 10011 in the West Village

Our phone number will still be 212-431-3724.

Office hours will be Tuesday & Saturday 2pm – 8pm

Ring bell 1A – Avalon Chiropractic.

Take door on the right. Walk down one floor.230w13th-street

For those who know the West Village, this is the same block as Integral Yoga and the LGBT Center.

The 1,2,3, A, C, E, F, L & M  subway lines are near by as are the M14A, M14D, M20 & M7 bus lines.

Dr Repetto will no longer be working at 455 W 23th Street.

The name of the Facebook page London Terrace Chiropractic & Applied Kinesiology will be changed to West Village Chiropractic & Applied Kinesiology on Feb 1st

The new site does have a flexion-distraction table which allows  Dr Repetto to open up and relax her patient’s spine more esp great for those  w/ disc or spinal stenosis problems .

Twitter page @DrVRepetto

Medical Articles of Interest for December 2016

Gut Microbiome Again Linked to Parkinson’s Symptoms

High Dietary Magnesium Intake Tied to Less Stroke, Diabetes, Heart Failure

Muscle Strength Gains Linked to Better Brain Function

Gastric Acid Blockers Boost Risk of Iron Deficiency

The Gut–Brain Connection

Statin Use Linked to Increased Parkinson’s Risk

Chronic Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors Increases Heart Risk

Selenium Supplement Role Unclear in Autoimmune Thyroiditis

Sauna Use Linked to Lower Dementia, Alzheimer’s Risk

 

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

 Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings? 

https://www.facebook.com/wvillagechiropracticappliedkinesiologynkt/

Or join me at Twitter: www.twitter.com/DrVRepetto

 

Anterolateral Lower Leg Pain &/or Foot Drop – Peroneal Nerve Entrapment – A NYC Chiropractor /Applied Kinesiologist /NeuroKinetic Therapist Explains

Occasionally a patient comes in with pain along the anterior lateral part of their lower leg and they may also have difficulty lifting the top of their foot upward at the ankle (dorsiflexion) or moving the foot outward at the ankle (eversion). This also affects the patient’s gait (ability to walk properly)

movements-of-foot

They may have been told that their problem is sciatica since branches of the sciatic nerve goes all way down the leg and into the toes. They may have been to a physical therapist or another chiropractor who worked on the low back where the sciatic nerve originates without any relief.

How a NYC Chiropractor /Applied Kinesiologist /NeuroKinetic Therapist Treats Sciatica

But the problem is the peroneal nerve which branches off the sciatic just below the knee; it goes from the common peroneal nerve which starts at the lateral back of the knee near the inner side of the biceps femoris  (part of the hamstings), goes to the back of the fibula bone and then branches off to the superficial peroneal nerve and the deep peroneal nerve.

The deep peroneal nerve innervates the muscles of the anterior compartment of the leg which are: tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, extensor digitorum longus, and the peroneus tertius. Together these muscles are responsible for dorsiflexion of the foot and extension of the toes.

The superficial peroneal nerve passes between the peroneus muscles and the extensor digitorum longus, and goes into the deep fascia at the lower third of the leg; it supplies the muscles of the lateral compartment of the lower leg : peroneus longus and peroneus brevis. These assist with eversion and plantar flexion of the foot.

The deep peroneal nerve passes inferior and medially, deep to extensor digitorum longus,  and comes into relation with the anterior tibial artery above the middle of the leg; it then descends with the artery to the front of the ankle-joint, where it divides into a lateral and a medial branch. The deep peroneal nerve innervates the muscles of the anterior compartment of the leg which are: tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, extensor digitorum longus, and the peroneus tertius. These muscles are responsible for dorsiflexion of the foot and extension of the toes.

superficial-and-deep-peroneal-nerve-and-muscles

Spasms of muscles along the route of these nerves can cause nerve entrapment and result in loss of muscle function or pain along the route of the nerves. As muscle attaches to bones and joints, spasms can cause misalignments of these structures and this can further complicate the problem.

Sometimes the muscle spasms are complicating for a muscle that is inhibited somewhere along the lateral or posterior kinetic chain such as the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, the hamstrings and the rectus femoris or the psoas which overwork in order to to lift the leg to clear the dropped foot during walking. Neurokinetic therapy works well answering this question and correcting the problem.

As a applied kinesiologist and neurokinetic therapist I will either place my finger or hand on specific areas and then retests the muscle to see if the weakness is corrected. This is called therapy localization.

If the therapy localization is positive and the area involved is a joint or a muscle, I can move the area in a way to stimulate neuro/mechano receptors in the joint or muscle. This is called a “challenge’ and shows the direction of manipulation needed to improve function of the joint or muscle.

As a chiropractor, I would not only adjust the involved joints but check to see if the change in gait muscles has affected the spine and adjust affected level.

Stretches are given to the previously complicating muscles and exercises given to the previously inhibited muscles in order to break the pattern that caused the problem.

For  more information, please read:

The Use of Applied Kinesiology in a Chiropractic Examination

How a Combination of Applied Kinesiology, NeuroKinetic Therapy and Chiropractic Works

 

 

© 2016-Dr. Vittoria Repetto

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

 Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings? 

https://www.facebook.com/wvillagechiropracticappliedkinesiologynkt/

Or join me at Twitter: www.twitter.com/DrVRepetto

 

Medical Articles of Interest for October 2016

SSRIs Disrupt Sleep in the Elderly, May Contribute to Dementia

Phytoestrogens May Benefit Health but Also Prompt Concern

Unclear If Sports Raise Later Arthritis Risk 

Sleep Duration Important in Weight Management

Micronutrient Deficiency Often Unnoticed in PPI Users

” PPIs have been associated with Clostridium difficile infection and with micronutrient deficiency. “Our hypothesis was that even though gastroenterologists know about micronutrient deficiency, they aren’t looking for it,” he explained. The researchers reviewed the electronic health records of 41 patients with Barrett’s esophagus who were on long-term PPI therapy to see if their levels of vitamin B₁₂, ferritin, or magnesium were ever tested”

Aerobic Exercise May Provide ‘Small’ Improvement in Vascular Cognitive Impairment

IBS: Gut Bacteria May Predict Who Benefits From FODMAP Diet

“Patients who did not respond to the low-FODMAP diet had more severe dysbiosis at baseline than responders. The traditional diet had no effect on overall bacterial composition, but in the FODMAP group, there was a significant reduction in potentially beneficial Bifidobacterium. This was more prominent in nonresponders than in responders.”

New Guideline Says Calcium Safe From CVD Standpoint

(Dr. Repetto’s comment – One should take calcium with magnesium, vitamin D and vitamin K. One should aim to get 1200 mg/day and half of that from food.)

 

 

Rib Pain or Intercostal Neuritis – A NYC Chiropractor/Applied Kinesiologist/NKT Practitioner Explains

Every few times during the year, I get a patient with a displaced rib head. (I’ve had one or two myself)  The sensation is an intense stabbing pain that “takes your breath away” in either the back or the front of the chest; sometimes the pain goes round the rib and sometimes seems to go from the back to the front like a knife.

When a patient comes in, we evaluate them via examination and a detailed history to rule out things like shingles or referred pain for heart, lung and gastrointestinal problems. A lot of the times, the patient has already been evaluated by their M.D. for these conditions with negative results.

But it’s usually a rib head displactment either at the anterior attachment at the sterum [breastbone] or at the posterior attachment at the transverse process of a thoracic vertebrae. The intercostal nerve runs from the anterior rami of the thoracic spinal nerves from T1 to T11 and runs [along with the artery and vein] between the intercostal muscles to the breastbone.

intercostal-nerve

intercostal-muscle

Of course it’s not surprising that a rib displacement “takes yr breath away” as the ribs (& the clavicle) and a lot of the muscles attached to them are involved in inspiration and expiration. Some of these muscles are the diaphragm, the external & internal intercostals, the serratus anticus, pectoralia minor, scalene & SCM muscles.

breathing-muscles

Muscles attached to the ribs or thoracic spine which may not be directly involved in breathing but may be compensating for a problem with the breathing muscles. Some of these muscles are the rectus abdominis, the abdominal oblique muscles, the quadratus lumborum, the rhomboids and latissimus dorsi; they may be on the same or contralateral side to the displaced rib.

Before I adjust any displacement of the ribs involved or the breastbone or the clavicle as a doctor of chiropractic; I need to balance the muscle pull on the affected area.

I use the muscle testing used in both Applied Kinesiology and NeuroKinetic therapy.

As a Applied Kinesiologist, I test for the function of individual muscles. The questions to be asked are: why is the muscle weak? Is the muscle on the other side hypertonic or “too stronger.” Is the weakness due to a spinal/nerve problem, a vascular problem, a problem with lymphatic function, a nutritional default, a problem with organ function or an acupoint associated w/ that muscle?

The Use of Applied Kinesiology in a Chiropractic Examination

As a NKT practitioner, I ask “Is there a dysfunction in the coordination of muscles working in patterns?” NeuroKinetic Therapy works with that concept that movement is performed in systems or patterns. NKT identifies muscle imbalances by using muscle testing to determine what muscles are inhibited and what muscles are compensating (facilitating) for them.

How a Combination of Applied Kinesiology, NeuroKinetic Therapy and Chiropractic Works

Once the above muscle related questions are answered, I can adjust the involved rib, clavicle or spinal segment.

Stretches are given to the previously facilitated (or hypertonic) muscles and exercises given to the previously inhibited (or weak/hypotonic) muscles in order to break the pattern that caused the problem.

For a blog on the effects of the breathing muscles on asthma, please check out: The Musculoskeletal Aspects of Asthma

© 2016-Dr. Vittoria Repetto

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

 Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings? 

https://www.facebook.com/wvillagechiropracticappliedkinesiologynkt/

Or join me at Twitter: www.twitter.com/DrVRepetto