Medical Articles Of Interest for February 2017

Eggs, High Dietary Cholesterol Not Linked to Increased Risk for Dementia, Alzheimer’s

Dr Repetto’s comment: Egg yolks contain choline, a supplement important for brain health.

Matching the Right Diet to the Right Patient

Sitting Less Linked to Lower Risk of Diabetes

DHA Supplements Linked to Less Progression to Alzheimer’s in APOE4 Carriers

More Support for Gut-Brain Link in Autism

Mediterranean Diet With Olive Oil Boosted HDL Function: PREDIMED

Dietary Protein – From Any Source – May Help Muscle Health

Vitamin D May Protect Against Respiratory Infections

Studies Suggest Cardiovascular Sweet Spot at Two Drinks per Day

Sports Hernias, Adductor Injuries, and Hip Problems Are Linked

 

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Please read: Hyla Cass, M.D.: Is Your Medication Robbing You of Nutrients Part 2: Getting Specific

Excellent article on how common medications deplete vital nutrients essential to your health, and explains how this happens.

Covers:  Anti-hypertensives, Beta blockers, Cholesterol – lowering drugs, Acid blockers, Antacids, Histamine-2 receptor antagonists & Proton-pump inhibitors, Oral hypoglycemics, Psychotrophic medications, Hormone replacement therapy and Antibiotics.

Click here: Hyla Cass, M.D.: Is Your Medication Robbing You of Nutrients Part 2: Getting Specific

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hyla-cass-md/is-your-medication-robbin_1_b_691711.html

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com or www.westbroadwaychiropractic.com
And please check out the Patient Testimonials at the “Our Practice” page at the web site
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Is Low Fat Really Healthy?

Or is a little bit of whole fat better for you?

So here we are with all the health gurus telling us that we should be eating all our foods in their natural forms aka un-processed. And yet when most of them talk about dairy, the majority of these people talk about drinking and consuming low fat milk, yogurt and cheeses. And of course, the same people talk about not using things like coconut milk or eating egg yolks. In fact I have seen articles talking about the Mediterranean diet and talking about how low fat dairy is part of that diet.

This is strange to this daughter of Italian immigrants who on her travels from her teenage yrs to the present (59 yrs old) never saw her grandparents who lived into their uppers 90’s & low 100’s (nonno & nonna – the latter) or the present healthy 80 something’s in her father’ hometown eat anything low fat. We have been so obsessed with the concept of low fat/saturated fat/no fat that for over 30 years we have poisoned ourselves by eating margarine and substituting trans fats for saturated fats and have added refined sugars (or worse high fructose corn syrup) to products like yogurt and ice cream. And yet we are fatter and much more important less healthy than we were thirty years ago.

One of our current epidemics is the low levels of Vitamin D in the general population.  Could the fact that we are not consuming enough fat to help absorb the fat soluble vitamins like Vitamin D(the fat soluble vitamins are Vitamin A, D, E and K) and Omega 3’s be playing a part in this besides not getting enough sun?  Fat also help us absorb proteins and calcium. Our brains also need fat; in fact our brains are mainly fat: http://www.fi.edu/learn/brain/fats.html#fatsbuild.

Could this obsession with low fat and 30 yrs of substituting trans fats be a factor in the rise of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s?? How might a low fat diet affect our dopamine receptors and our fat receptors in our tonque and brain?  Click here: Discovery of ‘fat’ taste could hold the key to reducing obesity

Are you taking turmeric as a natural inflammatory supplement; talk to an Ayurvedic healer and they will tell you that cooking turmeric in butter (ghee) or coconut oil or milk (in addition in combo with black pepper) potentates the effect of the turmeric.

We also know that whole fat dairy products (esp. from grass fed ruminants) contain more conjugated linoleic acid and has been shown to be possibly effective for preventing colon & rectal cancer, weight loss and atherosclerosis. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-826-CONJUGATED%20LINOLEIC%20ACID.aspx?activeIngredientId=826&activeIngredientName=CONJUGATED%20LINOLEIC%20ACID#vit_interactions http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/582029 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjugated_linoleic_acid

Inflammation and Brain Health

Research has shown links between our modern high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet, and increasing rates of certain diseases, particularly those relating to neurological dysfunction and overall brain health. As neurodegenerative disorders rise, so too has sugar consumption in the Western world. Yet, new research has shown that healthy, fat-rich diets have a myriad of benefits to the brain on the macro-scale in brain function, and benefits on the micro-scale in terms of inflammation. Recent studies have documented blood sugar’s effect on a wide collection of troubles from the size of the hippocampus, to diabetes, stroke and dementia risk.

And to be fair, some of the health gurus either do not demonize saturated fat or are starting to understand that it’s not fat but inflammation and the role that refined carbohydrates have in increasing the inflammation that has a bad effect on your heath. Please read: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mercola/the-cholesterol-myth-that_b_676817.html & http://www.huffingtonpost.com/andrew-weil-md/healthy-eating_b_629422.html

So what am I saying?

If you can tolerate dairy products and enjoy them, try switching to quality whole milk products (organic, growth hormone & antibiotic free, non-homogenized, grass fed, etc.) and eat them in moderation; maybe a few spoonfuls of yogurt a day or one pound of cheese consumed over 1-2 weeks.

If you eat meat, again eat them in moderation…try lean cuts from animals that have been grass-fed & raised in a sustainable manner. Eat no more than 4 ozs. a day and try to limit it to 4 times a week. Enjoy your eggs as nature intended w/ the yolks but limit yourself to 8-10 a week. And either cook them w/ olive oil instead of butter or poach them.

fats-that-can-reduce-your-risk-of-dying-exlarge-169

Eat lots of sources of mono-unsaturated fats in addition, incorporate some nuts and seeds into your diet, eat lots of veggies, some fresh fruit and stay away from refined sugars and fake or trans fats.

In other words,  enjoy your food in all its unprocessed whole glory, just be moderate in your intake.

Here are some studies comparing low fat milk to whole fat milk:  In a study in American Journal of Epidemiology 2007;166(11):1259-1269 entitled Calcium, Vitamin D, and Dairy Product Intake and Prostate Cancer Risk: The Multiethnic Cohort Study, no association of calcium or vitamin D intake was seen across racial/ethnic groups. In analyses of food groups, dairy product and total milk consumption were not associated with prostate cancer risk. However, low-/nonfat milk was related to an increased risk and whole milk to a decreased risk of total prostate cancer http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/567465

Eight-year-old children who drink full-fat milk every day have a lower BMI than those who seldom drink milk. This is not the case for children who often drink medium-fat or low-fat milk. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091103102347.htm University of Gothenburg (2009, November 4). Children Who Often Drink Full-Fat Milk Weigh Less, Swedish Research Finds. ScienceDaily.

In a study of Effect of consumption of whole milk and skim milk on blood lipid profiles in healthy men, the drinkers of whole milk had low lipid profiles http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8116537

In a 16 yr. study of Dairy consumption and patterns of mortality of Australian adults: there was no consistent and significant association between total dairy intake and total or cause-specific mortality. However, compared with those with the lowest intake of full-fat dairy, participants with the highest intake (median intake 339 g/day) had reduced death due to CVD (HR: 0.31; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12–0.79; P for trend=0.04) after adjustment for calcium intake and other confounders. Intakes of low-fat dairy, specific dairy foods, calcium and vitamin D showed no consistent associations.  http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v64/n6/abs/ejcn201045a.html

A reduction in dietary saturated fat has generally been thought to improve cardiovascular health.  The objective of this meta-analysis was to summarizethe evidence related to the association of dietary saturatedfat with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and cardiovasculardisease (CVD; CHD inclusive of stroke) in prospective epidemiologicstudies. Design: Twenty-one studies identified by searching MEDLINE andEMBASE databases and secondary referencing qualified for inclusionin this study. A random-effects model was used to derive compositerelative risk estimates for CHD, stroke, and CVD. Results: During 5–23 y of follow-up of 347,747 subjects,11,006 developed CHD or stroke. Intake of saturated fat wasnot associated with an increased risk of CHD, stroke, or CVD.The pooled relative risk estimates that compared extreme quantilesof saturated fat intake were 1.07 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.19; P = 0.22)for CHD, 0.81 (95% CI: 0.62, 1.05; P = 0.11) for stroke, and1.00 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.11; P = 0.95) for CVD. Consideration ofage, sex, and study quality did not change the results. Conclusions: A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studiesshowed that there is no significant evidence for concludingthat dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased riskof CHD or CVD. More data are needed to elucidate whether CVDrisks are likely to be influenced by the specific nutrientsused to replace saturated fat. http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/ajcn.2009.27725v1

Dairy Consumption and the Incidence of Hyperglycemia and the Metabolic Syndrome: Results from a French prospective study, Data from the Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR). This study links dairy intake with lower BMI , BP, TG, & reduced insulin resistance. (not funded by industry) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21447660  

Component in Common Whole Fat Dairy Foods May Cut Diabetes Risk http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101220200000.htm

© 2010-Dr. Vittoria Repetto  

© 2016 revision – Dr Vittoria Repetto

 

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com
And please check out the Patient Testimonials at my web site

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Getting Enough Calcium Into Your Bones? Ten Facts You Need to Know!

A while back, a fellow member of an e-mail list serve that I belong to, asked the following:
“What do you take for calcium if you are not getting enough from diet. I used to take Tums, but now I heard that they don’t do anything. Any suggestions?”

I said there are 10 facts you need to know in order to make sure that you are getting the calcium that you need.

The first fact that you need to know is that that you need an acidic ph in your stomach to help absorb the calcium. Our bodies supply this naturally w/ our own stomach acid. If you have a healthy digestive system that has not been abused w/ antacids, you are ok. But as we get older some people’s stomachs secrete less acid; to safeguard against this, some companies add Betaine HCl – a digestive enzyme and Vitamin C to their calcium supplements insure the proper Ph.
So what is Tums? It’s an antacid which uses a very cheap form of calcium called Calcium Carbonate that has an antacid effect all it’s own and therefore is mal-absorbed and you don’t get any calcium into your system. Remember, it’s not what you eat/take…It’s what you absorb!

The second fact that you need to know is that the two best-absorbed Calcium’s are Calcium Citrate and Microcrystallline Hydroxyapatite Concentrate (MCHC). MCHC is a complete bone food; it contains proteins (to produce collagen – the mesh that the calcium/minerals attaches it to form the bone) and other ingredients that comprise the organic portion of the bone, as well as calcium and other minerals.
Calcium citrate produces a higher peak calcium level in the blood. This is an interesting finding because the carbonate supplements actually contain more calcium per pill than those with the citrate.
I personally use a supplement that contains both MCHC and Calcium Citrate.
Your calcium supplement and/or your multi-vitamin/mineral should contain Vitamin K and boron as well as a complete mineral profile as these help your bones absorb calcium.

The third fact that you need to know is how to read the label of calcium supplements; most labels will list:
Calcium Citrate(1 tablet)………………….250 mg
But what you want to see listed is the Elemental Calcium; that is how much calcium you are getting; the rest of it is the citrate part of compound.
Calcium (Elemental)………………………100mg.

The four fact is that you need to take magnesium along w/ the calcium; magnesium helps activates the parathyroid hormone and Vitamin D that helps us to absorb the calcium into our digestive systems as well as working as a counterbalance to calcium in nerve stimulation/relaxation and prevent us from getting constipated from taking too much calcium. The present accepted ratio of calcium to magnesium is 2 to 1:( Ca 200/Mg 100).

The fifth fact is that you need Vitamin D in order to absorb the calcium. The current RDA is 200-400IU though with all the current research on Vitamin D and its effect on our immune system, some are suggesting that the new RDA be 800-1000IU. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin and can build up to toxic levels (above 10,000IU a day ) so be careful if you are taking cod liver oil or something similar. Always read labels carefully. Also try taking in sunshine for 20 minutes a day minus the sun block so that your body can make its own Vitamin D.

The sixth fact is that you should be taking your calcium supplement in the evening hours as that is when your Para-thyroid gland is most active. It increases gastrointestinal calcium absorption by activating Vitamin D and promotes calcium uptake by the kidneys
.
The seventh fact is that you should be taking calcium yrs before you enter menopause. Contrary to common misconception, bone is a living substance; one of the most active tissues in the body. It is constantly being dissolved and rebuilt in a process called remodeling and like any other living tissue, needs nourishment to stay strong and healthy. So in my opinion, a woman should take 400mg to 600 mg before she is 40 yrs. old (pregnant women need a lot more), take 600-1000 mg after 40. I recommend that you do not take more than 600mg in supplement form but try to get the majority of your calcium from foods like beans, leafy greens, almonds and some quality dairy products if you are not lactose-intolerant

The eighth fact is that some companies use fillers and binders that make it impossible for the calcium tablet to break down in your digestive system and be absorbed.
There is a simple test you can do at home: put 1/4 of a cup of vinegar in a jar (similar acidic ph as our stomachs), drop the Calcium supplement into jar, close and shake well for 15 min and then leave it on counter for 3 hrs…if it is not dissolved by then…then you are not absorbing it. You can do this to all your vitamins/minerals. I personally use and recommend a brand of vitamin/mineral that is highly absorbable…and I am of the opinion that you get what you pay for. Remember, it’s not what you eat/take…It’s what you absorb!

The ninth fact is that use of weight bearing exercise such as wt. training, swimming or using a cross-country machine accelerates the deposition of minerals into the bones.

The tenth fact is that there have been studies that show that overuse of animal proteins (western diet vs. eastern diet) and overuse of carbonated drinks (sodas/seltzer) accelerates the loss of minerals from our bones. There are also studies that show that the calcium in milk/ dairy products is not as well absorbed as the milk companies would have you believe. So I would suggest that you increase your intake of veggie protein (soy, nuts, beans and legumes , leafy greens and cruciferous veggies) and eat a moderate amount of animal protein and forget the sodas

© 2010-Dr. Vittoria Repetto / revised -2013

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

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Two Articles on Supplements You Should Read

The first is by Dr. Mark Hyman on how dietary supplements reduce health care costs:
 
 
The second is an article on Iodine by Chris D. Meletis, ND
http://www.integrativepractitioner.com/article.aspx?id=17728 Could Iodine be the next wide-spread nutritional deficiency after Vitamin D?

 

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com.
And please check out the Patient Testimonials at the “Our Practice” page at the web site.

Vitamin D: Why You Are Probably NOT Getting Enough and How That Makes You Sick


Sounds like you are taking either a cod liver oil supplement or a Vitamin A/D combo. Please be aware that in January 2001, the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) of the Institute of Medicine set the tolerable upper level (UL) of vitamin A intake for adults at 3,000 mcg (10,000 IU)/day of preformed vitamin A (oil soluble-retinol /not caroteniods.)
Also retinol intakes of 5,000 IU/day may be associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis in older adults.
Please read: http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminA/
More on Health
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com. And please check out the Patient Testimonials at the “Our Practice” page at the web site.

Podcast: Ancient Medicine Today: Applied Kinesiology with Dr.Vittoria Repetto

 
 
 
 
 

I’ve been interviewed for a program called Ancient Medicine Today, here’s the link and a short description written by my interviewer:
 

February 22, 2010 : On today’s show : We are going to venture into the practice of Applied Kinesiology. Here to share with us what is, as well as what it is not, is Dr.Vittoria Repetto. We’ll also take a walk on the wild side and learn about an herb that makes a great wine, and treats infections. Then, Stay tuned for Glancing at the stars, with Nick Symington. Nick is live in the studio with this weeks Astrological 411.

Dr Vittoria Repetto, is a Chiropractor as well as a practitioner of Applied Kinesiology. Vittoria practices in New York City. If you would like to find out more about Applied Kinesiology as well as other cutting edge health topics, I recommend taking a look at Dr.Vittoria Repetto’s blog. You will find it at : https://drvittoriarepetto.wordpress.com/

Applied Kinesiology is a system that evaluates: structural, chemical and mental aspects of a person’s health. The combined terms applied and kinesiology describe the basis of this system, which is the use of manual muscle testing to evaluate body function through the dynamics of the musculoskeletal system.

In general, the applied Kinesiologist finds a muscle that tests weak and then attempts to determine why that muscle is not functioning properly. The practitioner will then evaluate and apply the therapy that will best eliminate the muscle weakness and help the patient. In some cases, the practitioner may test for environmental or food sensitivities by using a previously strong muscle to find what weakens it.

Treatments may involve specific joint manipulation or mobilization, various myofascial therapies, cranial techniques, meridian and acupuncture skills, clinical nutrition, dietary management, as well as counseling.

 

 
Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com.
And please check out the Patient Testimonials at the “Our Practice” page at the web site.