Low Back Pain & Non Force Adjustments/SOT Blocking: A NYC Chiropractor/Applied Kinesiologist/NeuroKinetic Therapist Explains

One of the major complaints that causes patients to seek out a doctor of chiropractic is low back pain; it can be caused by either a problem with the lumbar spine or the sacrum.

As a doctor of chiropractic who is also an applied kinesiologist, I use a technique developed by Dr. DeJarnette called Sacro Occipital Technique (SOT); so named because of the relationship between the sacrum (base of the spine) and the occiput (base of the skull).

One of the functions of the sacrum is to pump cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) from the base of the spine back up the spinal canal to the brain and throughout the nervous system. The occiput also helps to pump CSF. The minute rhythmical motion is essential to optimal health – CSF effectively acts as the circulatory system of the brain and spinal cord.

The pelvis forms the foundational support of the human skeleton. It supports the upper body right up to the skull, and enables us to transfer our weight to our legs. The sacrum is a large bone located at the terminal part of the vertebral spine, where it forms the posterior aspect of the pelvis. The spine holds our body upright, supports all of our organs and provides anchor points for our muscles. It also protects our delicate nervous system. The nervous system controls our body, and can only function normally when our structures are balanced and our pelvis, sacrum and lumbar is stable.

Dr. DeJarnette’s studied two aspects of the sacroiliac joint; the anterior synovial portion and the posterior hyaline cartilage portion. The anterior sacroiliac joint should have motion and this is where sacral nutation and counternutation takes place. The posterior sacroiliac joint is focused on weight-bearing stability and support, which is why at the posterior joint surface there are interlocking of the ridges, and grooves by structures like muscles, ligaments and fascia.

DeJarnette evaluated the weight-bearing characteristics of the sacroiliac joint and determined that when the joint could not adequately support body weight then load bearing stress will be moved upward to the L5/S1 and L4/5 discs, most commonly.

DeJarnette developed an analysis which classified pelvic problems into three different categories and three different non-force techniques using SOT blocks in positions that correct the involved category.

sot-blocks

One of the major complaints that causes patients to seek out a doctor of chiropractic is low back pain; it can be caused by either a problem with the lumbar spine or the sacrum.

As a doctor of chiropractic who is also an applied kinesiologist, I use a technique developed by Dr. DeJarnette called Sacro Occipital Technique (SOT); so named because of the relationship between the sacrum (base of the spine) and the occiput (base of the skull).

One of the functions of the sacrum is to pump Cerebro-Spinal Fluid (CSF) from the base of the spine back up the spinal canal to the brain and throughout the nervous system. The occiput also helps to pump CSF. The minute rhythmical motion is essential to optimal health – CSF effectively acts as the circulatory system of the brain and spinal cord.

The pelvis forms the foundational support of the human skeleton. It supports the upper body right up to the skull, and enables us to transfer our weight to our legs. The sacrum is a large bone located at the terminal part of the vertebral spine, where it forms the posterior aspect of the pelvis. The spine holds our body upright, supports all of our organs and provides anchor points for our muscles. It also protects our delicate nervous system. The nervous system controls our body, and can only function normally when our structures are balanced and our pelvis, sacrum and lumbar is stable.

Dr. DeJarnette’s studied two aspects of the sacroiliac joint; the anterior synovial portion and the posterior hyaline cartilage portion. The anterior sacroiliac joint should have motion and this is where sacral nutation and counternutation takes place. 

pelvic-ligaments-ant

si-movement

The posterior sacroiliac joint is focused on weight-bearing stability and support, which is why at the posterior joint surface there are interlocking of the ridges, and grooves by structures like muscles, ligaments and fascia.

postsacrummuscles

DeJarnette evaluated the weight-bearing characteristics of the sacroiliac joint and determined that when the joint could not adequately support body weight then load bearing stress will be moved upward to the L5/S1 and L4/5 discs, most commonly.

DeJarnette developed an analysis which classified pelvic problems into three different categories and three different non-force techniques using SOT blocks in positions that correct the involved category.

Category One is a pelvic torsion with altered sacral nutation(motion)  This lack of nutation affects the spinal and cranial meningeal and CSF systems which function to a degree like a closed kinematic chain. Therefore symptoms can be low back pain, chronic shoulder complaints, thoracic outlet syndrome, CSF stagnation, and altered vasomotor function.

Involved muscles can be the piriformis, quadratus lumborum, sacrospinalis, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. As an applied kinesiologist, I’d check to see if they are hypotonic or hypertonic; as a neurokinetic therapist, I’d check to see if a muscle is weak (or inhibited) by another muscle compensating.

Therapy localization (TL) is done by putting 2 hands on each sacral-iliac joint and then challenging the pelvis for a structural listing and then blocks are put under the patient’s pelvis based to the findings.

The positive Tl’ed side is not adjusted. Cranials are checked.

Category Two happens when ligaments that hold the sacroiliac joint are stretched or sprained, allowing the joint surfaces to separate. Stress can aggravate this ligament weakness via adrenal hormone overdrive.

Symptoms can be low back pain, bowel complaints, possible dysfunction of the reproductive glands and the adrenals, shoulder problems and decreased cervical range of motion.

Involved muscles in addition to the ones mentioned in Category I are the sartorius, gracilis, rectus abdominals and hamstrings along with the iliolumbar ligament. These structures are tested via applied kinesiology and neurokinetic protocols mentioned above. Cranials again are checked.

Category Three occurs when the low back can no longer tolerate the physical stressors placed on it and involves both disc and nerve root aggravation. This can be a sudden one-off event such as a lift, or it can be a pre-existing weakness that is aggravated. Often Category Three produces pain in the low back and sometimes pain radiates down a leg as sciatica.

Muscles to be checked are the psoas as it attaches into the front of the lumbar vertebrae as well as the muscles involved in Category One as Category Three can be a Category One that was never corrected.

Correction in all the categories involves using blocks under the pelvis in specific directions related to the category and the subluxation/misalignment of the pelvis/sacrum. The patient’s weight and breathing help to balance the low back, sacrum and CSF flow and takes the pressure or irritation off the nerve. This allows the body to heal.

Patient is told to ice the involved areas, how to do daily activities, given stretches and exercises and advised on nutrition to help the body heal.

For more information on issues mentioned:

Cranial Sacral Therapy in Applied Kinesiology

How a Combination of Applied Kinesiology, NeuroKinetic Therapy and Chiropractic Works

The Use of Applied Kinesiology in a Chiropractic Examination

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

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The Correct Use of Muscle Testing in Nutritional Evaluation in Applied Kinesiology

When I’m meeting new people at a social or a networking event, I introduce myself as a Doctor of Chiropractic and an Applied Kinesiologist. Sometimes they have no idea what AK is and I fill them in. But most of the time, they will say something like “I had someone touch a spot on me and then pull down on my outstretched arm. It was weak. Then I held a bottle of pills and was told I needed them. Is that Applied Kinesiology?”

This is one of the big abuses of muscle testing.

In Applied Kinesiology, muscles are related to themselves and the joints they cross, their spinal innervation, their neuro-lymphathic & neuro-vascular points, the Chinese acupuncture meridian associated with them and the organs/glands via the meridian system.

So how does nutritional muscle testing work? First it is muscle specific, pulling down on an outstretched arm is not specific as it involves a number of muscles. And holding a bottle in hand stimulates nothing in your brain except maybe a placebo effect.

Here’s an example: a patient comes in with a shoulder problem and upon examination I find that one of the patient’s internal rotators – the Pectoralis Clavicular Major is weak.

The Pectoralis Clavicular is innervated by the lateral pectoral nerve that comes from the 5th & 6th cervical spinal nerves, it is associated w/ the Stomach meridian and in Chinese five-element theory is associated with worry.

Does the patient have a weak Pectoralis on one or do both sides tested together come up weak – a possible sign of cranial faults that need to be fixed? Does the patient have a history of digestive problems, heartburn, bloating, blenching, constipation? Is the patient experiencing emotional worries?

If no, then I proceed w/ either stretching or toning the muscle, rubbing out the neuro-lymphatic and neuro-vascular points for the muscles and seeing if the meridian is involved and seeing if the C5-6 spinal segments, the shoulder joints, clavicle or the sternum (breastbone ) or the ribs need to be adjusted. I then re-test the muscle to see if the problem is now fixed.

IMG_9084Retouched & crop

If yes, I proceed with the above as correcting the structural first sometime will help the digestive problems. A case in point is a patient with a lack of hydrochloric acid, indicated by bilateral pectoralis major weakness. Taking hydrochloric acid may clear the weakness.

But if the HCl is given, it hides the indicator for a temporal bulge or other cranial fault. A cranial fault may be causing entrapment of the Vagus nerve, thus causing hypochlorhydria that is responsible for the digestive problem in the first place. The proper approach is to correct the cranium and any other structural factor that is causing the hypochlorhydria.

I then talk to the patient about their diet, what foods or food combinations may be problematic for them and what supplements and medications – over the counter & prescription that they may be taking and to keep a food diary in which the patient also notes any digestive problems.

For example, the patient may have been advised to take Tums in order to get calcium; unfortunately the calcium carbonate in Tums is acting as an antacid and is adversely affecting the patient’s ability to digest and absorb food (including calcium) Take the patient off the Tums and the HCL problem resolves

I also talk to the patient about any emotional problems or stresses that may be affected them and we work w/ emotional meridian releasing techniques that the patient can also do at home.

On the next visit if the structural and emotional interactions have cleared then I test for nutritional factors such as HCL, or food allergies/sensitivities The patient is tested by placing sample of either the supplement or food in their mouth and having them chew in order to stimulate gustatory receptors in the brain and then the Pectoralis is then re-tested to see if there is a change in the muscle strength. The patient is then advised take whatever strengthened the indicator muscle and asked to note any changes in their food diary.

If nutritional testing doesn’t resolve the muscle weakness, then the patient may be advised to have some standard testing done such as testing for H. Pylori or anemia which can be affecting digestion such as iron, folic acid or B12 deficiencies.

On the following visit, the patient will continue to be evaluated to see if the digestive problems have resolved, if the structural and emotional indicators have resolved and when the patient no longer needs to take the supplementation.

As you see, the proper use of applied kinesiology in evaluating nutrition is made within the total framework of the triad of health – structural, emotional, chemical and includes both standard and kinesiologicial diagnostic procedures that confirm the need for the nutrition.

Correlation of applied kinesiology muscle testing findings with serum immunoglobulin levels for food allergies

©  2010-Dr. Vittoria Repetto

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

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A NYC Applied Kinesiologist on Your Ileo-Cecal Valve (& Houston’s) & Your Health

Problems w/ constipation? Diarrhea?  Having Strong urges to Defecate but Not Successful? Bloating?  Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Dark circles under your eyes? Sudden low back pain after bending over to pick up a dime on the floor? Pelvic Pains? Joint pains? Weakness of the Psoas, Iliacus or Quadriceps muscles – muscles involved in posture and locomotion

Could it be your Ileo-Cecal Valve (or your Houston’s valve) is involved?

The Ileo-Cecal Valve is located between the ileum (last portion of your small intestine) and the cecum or ascending colon (first portion of your large intestine; the appendix lays just below it.. Its function is to allow digested food materials to pass from the small intestine into your large intestine. The ileo-cecal valve also blocks these waste materials from backing back up into your small intestine. It is intended to be a one-way valve, only opening up to allow the digested material to pass through and then closing to prevent the fecal contents from “falling” back into the small intestine. When the small intestine/large intestine is not active in the process of digestion or stool production), the valve is relaxed, neither open or closed.

ileocecal-valve-diagram

Houston’s Valve – are transverse folds of rectum tissue that supports the weight of your feces and prevents pressure on the anal tissue to prevent a constant serse of urgency to defecate. A problem with the Houston’s valve can create a constant urge to defecate however the person may not be successful or have an incomplete defecation.

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Ileocecal Valve Syndrome

When the ileocecal valve is stuck open waste products can back up into the small intestine (much like a backed up kitchen sink drain) disturbing your digestion and also creating unhealthy toxins that are absorbed into the body. Also, if the ileocecal valve is stuck closed waste products are prevented or constricted from passing into the large intestine.

Unfortunately, this disorder is often overlooked by the medical profession. A dysfunctional ileocecal valve can result in a combination of symptoms.

Ileo-Cecal Valve (or Houston’s Valve)Syndrome Signs & Symptoms

Dark circles under eyes

Bowel disturbances (diarrhea / constipation)

Constant sense of urgency to defecate however either unsuccessful or incomplete.

Weakness of the Psoas, Iliacus or Quadriceps muscles – muscles involved in posture and locomotion

Low back pain – esp. pain on bending over

Severe lumbar disc complaints (sharp sudden pain)

Sinus problems, post nasal drip, headaches, tinnitus

GERD symptoms

Joint pains

Pelvic congestion and pain

PMS

Chronic inflammatory or toxicity complaints.

Causes of Ileo-Cecal Valve Syndrome

HCl Deficiency – Major Cause: Antacid Medication for GERD/H. Pylori – stops via various ways the flow of stomach acid needed to digest food, and absorb certain B vitamins and Calcuim.

Dehydration

Emotional upsets

High Colonics

How you eat (eating too quickly, eating foods you are sensitive to, under-chewing your food)

Foods you eat (carbonated drinks, alcohol, caffeine, chocolate, raw foods, hot spicy foods)

TMJ Disorders

Treating Ileo- Cecal Valve (or Houston’s) Syndrome
Treatment options for ileocecal valve (or Houston’s) syndrome are adjustment of the value itself, chiropractic adjustment of the spinal segmental that innervates the value, and the small intestine, large intestine and the rectal  neurovascular & neurolympathic pts for the valves and the small & large intestine,and rectum and a change in diet.

Please note that adjustment of the valve MUST BE DONE IN ORDER TO “FIX”THE PROBLEM; just doing the other techniques will not “fix” the problem.

Possible nutrition: Chlorophyll, digestive enzymes, Vitamin D, Calcium

Temporary Diet Recommendations During Treatment
Avoid for two weeks:

Roughage foods–such as: seeds, whole grains, raw vegetables

Spicy foods–such as: chili powder, hot peppers, salsas, black and cayenne pepper,

Also eliminate– liquors, alcoholic drinks, cocoa, chocolate, caffeine products

References for your information:

A) on the Ileo-cecal Valve:

http://education.yahoo.com/reference/gray/subjects/subject/249

http://depts.washington.edu/growing/Assess/SBS.htm

http://www.anatomyatlases.org/atlasofanatomy/plate37/06cecumappendix.shtml

http://depts.washington.edu/growing/Assess/SBS.htm

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FDL/is_2_12/ai_n17209639/ -(Iliocecal valve syndrome and its role in GI disorders)

B) On how a problem in visceral can “refer” pain to the back (for example)

http://www.webmanmed.com/spinalnrv_files/lumbar.html

www.instantanatomy.net/abdomen/muscles/iliacus.html

http://www.instantanatomy.net/abdomen/nerves/referredpain.html

http://depts.washington.edu/msatlas/images/201.jpg -picture of iliopsoas muscle – note how part of the muscle’s insertion is into the lumbar spine..unequal pull or inflammation due to referred pain on one side will cause low back pain

C) On Houston’s Valve: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transverse_folds_of_rectum

© Revised: 2012-Dr.Vittoria Repetto

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

 Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings? 

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