Medical Articles Of Interest for February 2017

Eggs, High Dietary Cholesterol Not Linked to Increased Risk for Dementia, Alzheimer’s

Dr Repetto’s comment: Egg yolks contain choline, a supplement important for brain health.

Matching the Right Diet to the Right Patient

Sitting Less Linked to Lower Risk of Diabetes

DHA Supplements Linked to Less Progression to Alzheimer’s in APOE4 Carriers

More Support for Gut-Brain Link in Autism

Mediterranean Diet With Olive Oil Boosted HDL Function: PREDIMED

Dietary Protein – From Any Source – May Help Muscle Health

Vitamin D May Protect Against Respiratory Infections

Studies Suggest Cardiovascular Sweet Spot at Two Drinks per Day

Sports Hernias, Adductor Injuries, and Hip Problems Are Linked

 

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Medical Articles of Interest for December 2016

Gut Microbiome Again Linked to Parkinson’s Symptoms

High Dietary Magnesium Intake Tied to Less Stroke, Diabetes, Heart Failure

Muscle Strength Gains Linked to Better Brain Function

Gastric Acid Blockers Boost Risk of Iron Deficiency

The Gut–Brain Connection

Statin Use Linked to Increased Parkinson’s Risk

Chronic Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors Increases Heart Risk

Selenium Supplement Role Unclear in Autoimmune Thyroiditis

Sauna Use Linked to Lower Dementia, Alzheimer’s Risk

 

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Medical Articles of Interest for October 2016

SSRIs Disrupt Sleep in the Elderly, May Contribute to Dementia

Phytoestrogens May Benefit Health but Also Prompt Concern

Unclear If Sports Raise Later Arthritis Risk 

Sleep Duration Important in Weight Management

Micronutrient Deficiency Often Unnoticed in PPI Users

” PPIs have been associated with Clostridium difficile infection and with micronutrient deficiency. “Our hypothesis was that even though gastroenterologists know about micronutrient deficiency, they aren’t looking for it,” he explained. The researchers reviewed the electronic health records of 41 patients with Barrett’s esophagus who were on long-term PPI therapy to see if their levels of vitamin B₁₂, ferritin, or magnesium were ever tested”

Aerobic Exercise May Provide ‘Small’ Improvement in Vascular Cognitive Impairment

IBS: Gut Bacteria May Predict Who Benefits From FODMAP Diet

“Patients who did not respond to the low-FODMAP diet had more severe dysbiosis at baseline than responders. The traditional diet had no effect on overall bacterial composition, but in the FODMAP group, there was a significant reduction in potentially beneficial Bifidobacterium. This was more prominent in nonresponders than in responders.”

New Guideline Says Calcium Safe From CVD Standpoint

(Dr. Repetto’s comment – One should take calcium with magnesium, vitamin D and vitamin K. One should aim to get 1200 mg/day and half of that from food.)

 

 

Possible Methods to Prevent Cognition Decline

There are studies going on that suggest that different foods, certain nutrients and exercise may have an effect on not only preventing amyloid deposits but may have an effect in clearing them. Some of the studies that are going on are based on observation of lower rates of Alzheimer’s in populations that use certain foods.
One can easily search for these studies at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed; I will mention a few of these studies
For example, observation of Indian & Southeast Asian populations that tend to eat a lot of curry have stimulated studies on Turmeric as a possible clearing mechanisms http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20622013
Rosemary has a very old reputation for improving memory, and has been used as a symbol for remembrance (during weddings, war commemorations and funerals) in Europe and Australia In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Ophelia says, “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance.”
Here’s a study of the effect of rosemary aroma on cognition  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12690999
In one study, greater amounts of walking are associated with greater gray matter volume, which is in turn associated with a reduced risk of cognitive impairment. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20944075?dopt=Abstract
There are studies that suggest that B vitamins may lower the rate of brain atrophy http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0012244
At the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society on  August 23, 2010, research on cultured mouse hippocampal cells,  found that extracts of blueberries, strawberries, and acai berries help autophagy, a method by which toxic debris are sequestered in the brain. Studies have shown that this “housekeeping” function in the brain declines considerably as we age, which can lead to the buildup of proteins linked to age-related mental decline and memory loss. http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/727764?src=mpnews

Copyright – 2010-Dr. Vittoria Repetto

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Health Effects of Turmeric & Curcuminoids

Antioxidant

Prevention & treatment of cancer
Helps prevent multi-drug resistance (synergistic with chemotherapy)

 
Anti-inflammatory
 
 
Antiarthritic
 
 
Neuroprotective
for Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s diseases – Multiple sclerosis
 
 
Enhances detoxification
Hepatoprotective
Choleretic – promotes production of bile salts
Mild chelator of heavy metals – Mercury & Lead
 
 
Cardioprotective
Decreases LDL oxidation
May inhibit platelet aggregation
 
 
Anti-bacterial
– In a study presented at the  American College of Gastroenterology’s annual meeting in San Antonio, turmeric was found to kill Clostridium difficile ( a highly resilient bacteria to antibiotics)  in a petri dish. The study points to the use of turmeric as a preventative to be used either in cooking or in capsule form; the research suggested that 4 gms of turmeric to be the affective dosage.
 
According to Ayurvedic traditions, the effects of turmeric potentates w/ the mixing of turmeric w/ a fat (such as ghee, oil or coconut milk and with pepper/chile peppers
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Anti-Oxidant Foods: Rosemary

Benefits of Rosemary & Constituents
(Carnosic Acid, Rosemarinic Acid, Caffeic Acid)
• Antioxidant
– Anti-aging
• Cancer preventive
• Anti-inflammatory
– Cardiovascular disease
• Enhances detoxification of
– Endogenous estrogens & xenoestrogens
• Neuro-protectant against
– Strokes
– Alzheimer
– Lou Gehrig’s disease
Rosemary has a very old reputation for improving memory, and has been used as a symbol for remembrance (during weddings, war commemorations and funerals) in Europe and Australia In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Ophelia says, “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance.” From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosemary
I personally like to add lots of rosemary leaves to my chicken or veggie stock, add rosemary sprigs to the pan when roasting veggies such as potatoes, carrots, celery, onions, parsnips, turnips, etc.

Quickly rinse rosemary under cool running water and pat dry. Most recipes call for rosemary leaves, which can be easily removed from the stem. Alternatively, you can add the whole sprig to season soups, stews and meat dishes, then simply remove it before serving. A few quick serving ideas:

Add fresh rosemary to omelets and frittatas.

Rosemary is a wonderful herb for seasoning chicken and lamb dishes.

Add rosemary to tomato sauces and soups.

Purée fresh rosemary leaves with olive oil and use as a dipping sauce for bread.

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com
And please check out the Patient Testimonials page at the web site
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Is Low Fat Really Healthy?

Or is a little bit of whole fat better for you?

So here we are with all the health gurus telling us that we should be eating all our foods in their natural forms aka un-processed. And yet when most of them talk about dairy, the majority of these people talk about drinking and consuming low fat milk, yogurt and cheeses. And of course, the same people talk about not using things like coconut milk or eating egg yolks. In fact I have seen articles talking about the Mediterranean diet and talking about how low fat dairy is part of that diet.

This is strange to this daughter of Italian immigrants who on her travels from her teenage yrs to the present (59 yrs old) never saw her grandparents who lived into their uppers 90’s & low 100’s (nonno & nonna – the latter) or the present healthy 80 something’s in her father’ hometown eat anything low fat. We have been so obsessed with the concept of low fat/saturated fat/no fat that for over 30 years we have poisoned ourselves by eating margarine and substituting trans fats for saturated fats and have added refined sugars (or worse high fructose corn syrup) to products like yogurt and ice cream. And yet we are fatter and much more important less healthy than we were thirty years ago.

One of our current epidemics is the low levels of Vitamin D in the general population.  Could the fact that we are not consuming enough fat to help absorb the fat soluble vitamins like Vitamin D(the fat soluble vitamins are Vitamin A, D, E and K) and Omega 3’s be playing a part in this besides not getting enough sun?  Fat also help us absorb proteins and calcium. Our brains also need fat; in fact our brains are mainly fat: http://www.fi.edu/learn/brain/fats.html#fatsbuild.

Could this obsession with low fat and 30 yrs of substituting trans fats be a factor in the rise of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s?? How might a low fat diet affect our dopamine receptors and our fat receptors in our tonque and brain?  Click here: Discovery of ‘fat’ taste could hold the key to reducing obesity

Are you taking turmeric as a natural inflammatory supplement; talk to an Ayurvedic healer and they will tell you that cooking turmeric in butter (ghee) or coconut oil or milk (in addition in combo with black pepper) potentates the effect of the turmeric.

We also know that whole fat dairy products (esp. from grass fed ruminants) contain more conjugated linoleic acid and has been shown to be possibly effective for preventing colon & rectal cancer, weight loss and atherosclerosis. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-826-CONJUGATED%20LINOLEIC%20ACID.aspx?activeIngredientId=826&activeIngredientName=CONJUGATED%20LINOLEIC%20ACID#vit_interactions http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/582029 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjugated_linoleic_acid

Inflammation and Brain Health

Research has shown links between our modern high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet, and increasing rates of certain diseases, particularly those relating to neurological dysfunction and overall brain health. As neurodegenerative disorders rise, so too has sugar consumption in the Western world. Yet, new research has shown that healthy, fat-rich diets have a myriad of benefits to the brain on the macro-scale in brain function, and benefits on the micro-scale in terms of inflammation. Recent studies have documented blood sugar’s effect on a wide collection of troubles from the size of the hippocampus, to diabetes, stroke and dementia risk.

And to be fair, some of the health gurus either do not demonize saturated fat or are starting to understand that it’s not fat but inflammation and the role that refined carbohydrates have in increasing the inflammation that has a bad effect on your heath. Please read: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mercola/the-cholesterol-myth-that_b_676817.html & http://www.huffingtonpost.com/andrew-weil-md/healthy-eating_b_629422.html

So what am I saying?

If you can tolerate dairy products and enjoy them, try switching to quality whole milk products (organic, growth hormone & antibiotic free, non-homogenized, grass fed, etc.) and eat them in moderation; maybe a few spoonfuls of yogurt a day or one pound of cheese consumed over 1-2 weeks.

If you eat meat, again eat them in moderation…try lean cuts from animals that have been grass-fed & raised in a sustainable manner. Eat no more than 4 ozs. a day and try to limit it to 4 times a week. Enjoy your eggs as nature intended w/ the yolks but limit yourself to 8-10 a week. And either cook them w/ olive oil instead of butter or poach them.

fats-that-can-reduce-your-risk-of-dying-exlarge-169

Eat lots of sources of mono-unsaturated fats in addition, incorporate some nuts and seeds into your diet, eat lots of veggies, some fresh fruit and stay away from refined sugars and fake or trans fats.

In other words,  enjoy your food in all its unprocessed whole glory, just be moderate in your intake.

Here are some studies comparing low fat milk to whole fat milk:  In a study in American Journal of Epidemiology 2007;166(11):1259-1269 entitled Calcium, Vitamin D, and Dairy Product Intake and Prostate Cancer Risk: The Multiethnic Cohort Study, no association of calcium or vitamin D intake was seen across racial/ethnic groups. In analyses of food groups, dairy product and total milk consumption were not associated with prostate cancer risk. However, low-/nonfat milk was related to an increased risk and whole milk to a decreased risk of total prostate cancer http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/567465

Eight-year-old children who drink full-fat milk every day have a lower BMI than those who seldom drink milk. This is not the case for children who often drink medium-fat or low-fat milk. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091103102347.htm University of Gothenburg (2009, November 4). Children Who Often Drink Full-Fat Milk Weigh Less, Swedish Research Finds. ScienceDaily.

In a study of Effect of consumption of whole milk and skim milk on blood lipid profiles in healthy men, the drinkers of whole milk had low lipid profiles http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8116537

In a 16 yr. study of Dairy consumption and patterns of mortality of Australian adults: there was no consistent and significant association between total dairy intake and total or cause-specific mortality. However, compared with those with the lowest intake of full-fat dairy, participants with the highest intake (median intake 339 g/day) had reduced death due to CVD (HR: 0.31; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12–0.79; P for trend=0.04) after adjustment for calcium intake and other confounders. Intakes of low-fat dairy, specific dairy foods, calcium and vitamin D showed no consistent associations.  http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v64/n6/abs/ejcn201045a.html

A reduction in dietary saturated fat has generally been thought to improve cardiovascular health.  The objective of this meta-analysis was to summarizethe evidence related to the association of dietary saturatedfat with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and cardiovasculardisease (CVD; CHD inclusive of stroke) in prospective epidemiologicstudies. Design: Twenty-one studies identified by searching MEDLINE andEMBASE databases and secondary referencing qualified for inclusionin this study. A random-effects model was used to derive compositerelative risk estimates for CHD, stroke, and CVD. Results: During 5–23 y of follow-up of 347,747 subjects,11,006 developed CHD or stroke. Intake of saturated fat wasnot associated with an increased risk of CHD, stroke, or CVD.The pooled relative risk estimates that compared extreme quantilesof saturated fat intake were 1.07 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.19; P = 0.22)for CHD, 0.81 (95% CI: 0.62, 1.05; P = 0.11) for stroke, and1.00 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.11; P = 0.95) for CVD. Consideration ofage, sex, and study quality did not change the results. Conclusions: A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studiesshowed that there is no significant evidence for concludingthat dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased riskof CHD or CVD. More data are needed to elucidate whether CVDrisks are likely to be influenced by the specific nutrientsused to replace saturated fat. http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/ajcn.2009.27725v1

Dairy Consumption and the Incidence of Hyperglycemia and the Metabolic Syndrome: Results from a French prospective study, Data from the Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR). This study links dairy intake with lower BMI , BP, TG, & reduced insulin resistance. (not funded by industry) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21447660  

Component in Common Whole Fat Dairy Foods May Cut Diabetes Risk http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101220200000.htm

© 2010-Dr. Vittoria Repetto  

© 2016 revision – Dr Vittoria Repetto

 

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