Gut – Brain Axis Seminar on April 13th – A NYC Chiropractor/Applied Kinesiologist/ NeuroKinetic Therapist will be attending.

Brain Body: Personalized Lifestyle Medicine for the Gut-Brain Axis
Presented by Sara Gottfried, MD

Seminar Description:

Previously overlooked, we now know that the 100 trillion gut microbes of healthy people influence their well being in substantial ways. Those trillions of bugs vary from one healthy person to another and from one unhealthy person to another. Meanwhile, as practitioners, we are witnessing an epidemic rise in the incidence of inflammatory conditions associated with the gut-brain axis dysfunction, including anxiety, depression, and early memory loss.

Developing research shows  these conditions are associated with an imbalance (dysbiosis) in the gut microbiome. There is constant talk between the gut and brain

Some of it travels along the  vagus nerve, and some of it travels in the blood, especially via nutrients, hormones, proteins, peptides, and inflammatory messengers like antibodies and cytokines.

The good news is that while abnormal gut microbiota can lead to dysfunction of the brain body and cause brain symptoms like anxiety, depression, brain fog,rising set point, and memory loss, correcting perturbations in gut health is an emerging strategy used as part of a plan to address such symptoms. Currently, the lifetime risk of anxiety is 30 percent, and higher in women, while lifetime risk of depression is approximately 21 to 45 percent for women and 10 to 30 percent for men.

Mainstream medicine taught us that anxiety is a response to perceived threat, whereas depression is a response to perceived harm or loss. For decades, anxiety has been treated with benzodiazepines, in an effort to mask symptoms, and depression with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or a new generation of similar pharmaceuticals and occasionally cognitive behavioral therapy. We were also taught that memory loss and other signs of cognitive decline are an inevitable result of aging.

Turns out that a more accurate characterization is that these conditions are manifestations of a gut/brain axis that is out of homeostasis.There are five key ways that dysbiotic gut flora can promote anxiety, depression, and cognitive decline: by making your gut wall leaky, by manipulating your stress response (and therefore your hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/thyroid/gonadal axes), by disrupting your immune response, by causing chronic inflammation in the body and brain (neuroinflammtion), and by producing harmful peptides and other chemical messengers. In this interactive presentation, I will learn personalized lifestyle medicine strategies for improving intestinal wall integrity—specifically with the use of targeted dietary and lifestyle interventions—including nutrigenomic approaches, “behaviorceuticals” (physical activities that improve mental health), and targeted prebiotics and probiotics.

Objectives:
• Review the normal and abnormal function of the gut-brain axis and how it impacts the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/thyroid/gonadal (HPATG) axes and default mode network.

• Identify the role of intestinal permeability and the gut microbiome in stress, mood, an overactive HPATG, and central nervous system disorders.

• Review personalized lifestyle medicine strategies for improving intestinal wall integrity with the use of targeted dietary and lifestyle interventions, including nutrigenomic approaches, “behaviorceuticals,” and targeted prebiotics and probiotics.

 

About Sara Gottfried, MD
Sara Gottfried, MD is a board-certified gynecologist and physician scientist. She graduated from Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and completed residency at the University of California at San Francisco. Over the past two decades, Dr. Gottfried has seen more than 25,000 patients and specializes in identifying the underlying cause of her patients’ conditions to achieve true and lasting health transformations, not just symptom management. She is more likely to test her patient’s DNA and next-generation biomarkers and then prescribe a customized protocol, using primarily food (not drugs) plus other proven lifestyle interventions to optimize the gene/environment interface. For each patient, she designs an N-of-1 trial to provide rapid information on whether the personalized lifestyle plan will improve outcomes. It’s not one method fits all. It’s not disease-centered. It’s not fix- em-up-and-send-’em-home. It’s a mission to transform healthcare, one patient at a time. Dr. Gottfried is the Chief Medical Officer of Metagenics, a health sciences company based in Aliso Viejo, California, which is dedicated to leading the movement to make personalized nutritional and lifestyle intervention the standard of care in medicine. Additionally, Dr. Gottfried is the president of Metagenics Institute. Dr. Gottfried is a global keynote speaker who practices evidence-based integrative,
precision, and Functional Medicine. She has written three New York Times bestselling books: The Hormone Cure, The Hormone Reset Diet, and her latest, Younger: A Breakthrough Program to Reset Your Genes, Reverse Aging, and Turn Back the Clock 10 Years.

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

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PTSD and Applied Kinesiology Techniques to Help

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder that’s triggered by a traumatic event; sufferers may have the following symptoms of nightmares, insomnia, flashbacks, rage, emotional numbing, hypervigiliance, hyperarousal, depression, anxiety, intrusive thoughts and avoidance.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/post-traumatic-stress-disorder/DS00246

 There are a number of techniques that can help the PSTD patient cope better w/ their stresses and there are even techniques that the patient can practice at home.

 The first one involves the adrenal glands, an organ involved in our sympathetic reflex or “the fight or flight reaction” Continuous stress can cause the adrenals not to function optimally; symptoms can include fatigue, insomnia, depression brain fog, etc. if the adrenals are involved, then the PTSD patient might present w/ weak Sartorius muscle, a craving for salty foods, blood pressure that drops upon sudden standing or their pupils may have a sluggish reaction to light.

 Help for the adrenals involves stimulation of the neurolymphatics and neurovascular points associated w/ the Sartorius muscle and it’s link via the Chinese meridian system to the adrenals. This is a technique that the patient can do at home.

 Another muscle to look at is the Pectoralis Clav. Major that is associated to the stomach via the Chinese meridian system. We know that anxiety and stress being a predisposing factor in stomach dysfunction raging form “butterflies” in the stomach, to a gastric ulcer to emotional chest pain.

 The patient’s Pectoralis muscle would be tested while recalling a traumatic event If the muscle tests weak, then the doctor contacts the emotional neurovascular reflex pt until a synchronous pulse is felt bilaterally. Then the patient again recalls the traumatic event and the pectorals are re-tested. If the pectorals test strong, then the emotional recall is lessened in its ability to affect the patient. And the patient is taught to do the reflex work at home.

 Another technique involves negating a patient’s self-sabotaging behavior. We have the patient speak a positive statement such as “I want to be healthy” and if that statement causes any muscle to be weak then we know that there is a conflict in the mind-body connection. We then have the patient say the positive phase again while holding either points on the Small Intestine meridian; the point used is the one that allows the previously weak muscle to test strong. An acu-aid is placed on the point and the patient instructed to tap the point if they feel their symptoms creeping up on them.

 Another technique is the Temporal Tap which works as an auto-suggestion. The patient is taught to tap the temporo-sphenoidal line on the side of his head while inputting a negative statement such as “I have no need to yell.” on the right side  And then the patient inputs a positive statement such “I will be calm”.

 This technique works wonders for insomnia.

 Another technique involves holding acupuncture points while the patient thinks about his fears or anger or anxiety and we observe if that “causes a muscle to go weak; meridians associated w/ fear may be the kidney/bladder meridian or the stomach or the liver/gall bladder for anger issues. Then the patient (or the doctor) taps the beginning and end point of the meridian involved and the muscle is re-tested as the patient thinks again about his problem. A positive outcome would be a strong muscle test and the patient feeling that his fear has lessened

As you see with testing by a doctor using applied kinesiology, the patient can actively take a role in becoming healthier, more calm, more social. etc

© 2010-Dr. Vittoria Repetto

Common Medications for PTSD Tied to Increased Dementia Risk

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice at 230 W. 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials at my web site.

 Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings? Follow me at https://www.facebook.com/wvillagechiropracticappliedkinesiologynkt/

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To Salt or Not to Salt, That is the Question

For the last 2 months, esp. here in NYC, we have been hearing about public health officials and some politicians wanting to not just force food companies to reduce the salt in their processed foods but to also make it a violation for a restaurant to cook w/ salt.

Now let me make myself perfectly clear: decreasing salt in processed foods, in general, is a good idea. A better idea would be not to eat any processed foods but I digress

And let me say that I recommend that people use sea salt rather than table salt as sea salt also contains other important mineral salts such as magnesium, potassium which helps regulate our blood pressure and naturally contains other trace minerals such as iodine. Commercial table salt is a chemically made product, the only “salt” in it is sodium chloride (also holds true for kosher salt) contains no other trace minerals and may contain additives like aluminum silicate in order to keep it “powdery and porous” http://www.causeof.org/salt.htm#SeaSaltIodized

sea salt foam

The food companies have made a science of seducing our taste buds and our brains w/ the lore of sweet and salty especially with the huge swing towards low fat foods in the 1980’s & ‘90’s that the medical establishment told us to start eating in order to lower our cholesterol and prevent heart attacks and strokes.

And what happened: “The harder the experts try to save Americans, the fatter we get…..The anti-fat campaign definitely made an impact on the marketing of food, but as we gobbled up all the new low-fat products, we kept getting fatter. Eventually, in 2000, the experts revised the dietary guidelines and conceded that their anti-fat advice may have contributed to diabetes and obesity by unintentionally encouraging Americans to eat more calories.” http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/23/science/23tier.html?hpw

So I have to wonder if this cutting down of salt will contribute to new problems such as iodine deficiencies, dehydration problems, too low blood pressure and adrenal fatigue.

Concentrated primarily in the thyroid gland, iodine is a important trace mineral that plays an important role in the body’s biological functions. In fact, the U.S. government in the 1920’s recommended that iodine be added to table salt. The ruling was a strategy to ensure that an iodine deficiency didn’t develop in the American diet. And it worked pretty well

Iodine deficiency is involved in hypothyroidism, fatigue, depression, cretinism, weight gain and possible connections to breast cancer, thymus, salivary gland and oral health.

Iodine is found naturally in a number of foods such as seafood, seaweed, egg yolks and milk and plants grown in iodine rich soil.

Clearly if you are eating the above foods…and I hope that your milk is organic and your eggs free ranging and the soil your veggies grow in is not nutrient deprived and your fish not farmed; then you have a good chance of getting enough iodine. Add to that that you are not eating commercial bread, made w/ bromides (an iodine agonist) instead of iodine

Frequently in the summer months, I’ll have patients complain about fatigue and dizziness and after some questions about sweating, exercise, and their cooking practices, I usually discover that they didn’t use any salt in their cooking. They are the exact opposite of people who not only use salt for cooking but then add salt to their food when it’s on the plate. So balance is the key here, hot weather, sweating a great deal are good reasons to add a little more salt.

And again I’m talking about adding sea salt instead of table salt to your food as the potassium and magnesium salts in sea salt help w/ blood pressure

One of the functions of the adrenal gland is to produce mineralocorticoids which help keep your blood pressure and blood volume normal by maintaining a proper balance of sodium, potassium and water in your body. And so I’ve found find that patients w/ chronic adrenal fatigue crave salt.

So again moderate use of iodized sea salt is a good thing..just a pinch…not more that a 1/8 of a teaspoon…not the 1-2 teaspoons that I see when I watch cooking shows (yes, I yell at the TV..lol)

Here’s some websites you may find useful:

http://www.drlwilson.com/Articles/salt.htm

http://www.causeof.org/salt.htm#SeaSaltIodized

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/09/05/Most-Common-Cause-of-Fatigue-that-is-Missed-or-Misdiagnosed-by-Doctors–.aspx

http://www.saltworks.us/salt_info/si_Gourmet_Reference.asp

© -2010- Dr. Vittoria Repetto

added in 2011:

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/744014?src=mp&spon=18 Low Sodium and High Risk? Maybe It’s Not the Salt

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic/ NKT practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page on my web site.

 Want to be in the know on holistic information and postings? 

https://www.facebook.com/wvillagechiropracticappliedkinesiologynkt/