Thoughts on Whiplash or Neck Trauma by a NYC Chiropractor/Applied Kinesiologist

“Whiplash” is commonly associated with auto accidents but also can be associated with many types of trauma like sport injuries, bad falls and even nodding off in chair and awaking with a sudden jerking of the neck.

The term “whiplash” refers to the mechanism of the injury. The proper terminology is cervical hyperextension/hyperflexion sprain. Hyperextension means that the head and neck are bent backward beyond their normal range of movement. Hyperflexion means that the head and neck are bent forward beyond the normal range of motion. Symptoms can include neck and back pain, loss of range of motion, shoulder & arm pain or numbness, jaw pain, dizziness, headaches, nausea, difficulty swallowing etc.

Within the neck region’s joints are some of the most complex movements within the body. The cervical bones house and protect the spinal cord. Nerves from the cord pass out of the spine between the vertebrae; nerve entrapment can happen due to the shift of the cervical joint and spasm in both the smaller vertebral muscles http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/the-prevertebral-muscles-of-the-neck.html that control fine movements and the larger and longer muscles https://www.realbodywork.com/learn/neck/neck.htm that control the gross movements of the neck which can result in the above

cervical muscles

Cranial-Sacral Mechanism: the skull and sacrum operate in ways that are often inadequately considered in whiplash cases. There is movement between the cranial bones and the sacrum called the cranial sacral respiratory mechanism that pumps cerebrospinal fluid https://drvittoriarepetto.wordpress.com/2010/05/17/cranial-sacral-therapy-in-applied-kinesiology/ up and down the spine that helps keep the nerves healthy. Whiplash can cause jamming of the cranial bones resulting in poor function. Poor function of this mechanism can interfere with cranial nerves, some of which control neck muscles, muscles that move the eyes, and muscles that move the jaw, muscles involved with swallowing and breathing.

Some of the very bizarre symptoms of whiplash trauma develop as a result of cranial dysfunction. Intricately associated with this area are the nerves responsible for balance. These include cranial nerve VIII, which supplies the balance mechanism of the middle ear, cranial nerves III, IV, and VI that supply the muscles that move the eyes and are intricately associated with the visual righting reflexes, and the nerve endings in the upper cervical vertebral ligaments that supply the head on-neck reflexes. These reflexes must work together. If there has been injury causing improper nerve supply to one or more of these areas, neurologic disorganization develops that can cause a change in muscle function throughout the body; there may be dizziness, ear ringing, nausea, blurred or double vision, headaches, and myriad other symptoms.

Many whiplash patients develop pain in the jaw joint, called the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which is aggravated by chewing. https://drvittoriarepetto.wordpress.com/2013/06/26/tmj-problems-jaw-problems-and-how-a-nyc-chiropractorapplied-kinesiologist-handles-the-problem/

As a doctor of chiropractor who also does applied kinesiology, I not only deal with restoring the proper movement of the cervical vertebrae https://drvittoriarepetto.wordpress.com/2010/07/17/the-subluxationspinal-joint-dysfunction/ but almost dealing with the injury to the both the flexion and extension muscles of the cervical area mentioned above whether they need to be relaxed or whether they need to be strengthened. https://drvittoriarepetto.wordpress.com/2010/06/21/muscle-balancing-in-applied-kinesiology/

Nutrition is suggested to help repair injured muscle fibers.

Cranial bone movement is checked via muscle testing and restored by non-force movements with inspiratory assistance

The movement of the sacrum, commonly missed in a non-applied kinesiology office, is checked for dysfunction and adjusted for return of normal function and proper flow of the cerebrospinal fluid so important to the health of the brain and the spinal cord and nerves.

 

© 2015-Dr. Vittoria Repetto

Want more information on Dr. Vittoria Repetto and her NYC Applied Kinesiology/Chiropractic practice at 230 W 13th St., NYC 10011; please go to www.drvittoriarepetto.com

And please check out the Patient Testimonials page at my web site.

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